Hello. Welcome to Nerve Center. 
That which is (and was) currently swirling inside my mind. 

"Such a collection of ephemeral treasure is an example of how we find the things that tell us who we are, even if it gives instead the impression that a parallel universe of KM’s own work has found him - by carefully infiltrating the most ordinary places: the local newspaper, or the fold of a carton of milk, or the back of a parking ticket." (Elliman)

 
Sarah Sze Weathervane 2012

Sarah Sze
Weathervane
2012

Garbage - "No Horses" - 2017

The Handmaid's Tale, Season 1 Episode 3, 2017
https://www.hulu.com/the-handmaids-tale
Soundtrack: Blondie vs Philip Glass - Heart of Glass (DaftBeatles Crabtree Remix)

What does Eisenman think about when she’s on Fire Island? “Ghosts,” she says, explaining that the island evokes — or rather is haunted by — the spirits of a generation of men and women: artists, thinkers, people of color, the affluent, the middle class, the ignored, the displaced, those let down by their government, those who caught the disease too early, those who didn’t realize they had caught it at all, those who thought they would never catch it but who did, all of those who were lost to the dark times when she first came to New York City in the early 1990s, at the height of the AIDS crisis. Many gay men and women, many of whom would have been her peers, were dead and many more would die later. Her first major institutional show, a group exhibition of wall drawings at the Drawing Center in 1992, occurred the year activist Mary Fisher rebuked the Republicans for their policies of silence, tennis star Arthur Ashe had announced that he had been living with HIV for years, and the FDA approved the use of ddC in combination with AZT. It was a time of further disappearances. Crisis provokes lists: We count what’s gone and what remains. Everywhere the island attests to the dead, to the bodies who are not there, the figures who might have been paintings, the figures who might have loved paintings. “You can feel them there,” Eisenman says.

. . . Eisenman tells me she has been recently spending her days on the island drawing her friends. Later that night, she sends me images of the small works on paper. A woman sits looking at her computer, her head held up by her left hand. A man lies naked on a towel strumming a guitar while a woman, her legs open to reveal tufts of pubic hair, listens intently. Friends lounge on the beach, make a human pyramid, and check cell phones against a backdrop of beach grass. I consider the living as she considers them. Drawing is a way of keeping them there.

"Painting Ghosts," by Andrew Durbin for Out Magazine, October 2015

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"Straight photography: The curious term was already in use during the 1880's, as Carleton Watkins and others trekked the West and sent home photographs of a sublime landscape Easterners could scarcely imagine; the unmanipulated prints - sometimes mammoth in scale - sometimes formatted to lifelike stereo - served as simple proof. By the 1900's when modernism hit its mark and photographers such as Paul Strand began propagandizing for photographic objectivity, straight photography came to signify an optical imperative, or "truth," that was a modernist truth of rational science, heroic industry, and social progress. Performing this new reality of twentieth-century modernism, American photographers embraced sharp focus and monumental form, conjuring symbols of potent self-assurance, which might strike us today as hopelessly, fabulously, macho, confident, optimistic, naive.  Naturally, straight photography was never conceived in opposition to "gay photography" (IF E. Holland Day and Minor White had thoughts on this, they kept it to themselves). But today the dyad is obvious and easy game. Queer is a serviceable counter to monolithic, dominant histories of heroic modernism - Duchamp versus Picasso, Warhol versus Pollock. But if flamboyant color and a sense of tragedy seem to denote a "camp" sensibility, defined by Susan Sontag fifty years ago as a "love of artifice and exaggeration," history has now overwhelmed such quaint classifications. Rather than thinking of Sherry's Photographs as a queering or personalizing of a Western landscape tradition, with environmental overtones, it might be more insightful to point out that photography - straight or otherwise - always has made the world queer, abstracting and two-dimensionalizing everything it records. In that sense, Sherry's work does not queer American modernist photography so much as it brings to the surface what was already latent: a queer and common feeling of alienation from the "natural" as well as the modern world. Today, as so-called aberrant sexualities become more normative, and technologies elaborate denser skeins of mediation between humans and their natural environments, the outsider's perspective becomes the norm.  - Kevin Moore writing on David Benjamin Sherry in Aperture 218: Queer, Spring 2015 (bolding mine)

"Straight photography: The curious term was already in use during the 1880's, as Carleton Watkins and others trekked the West and sent home photographs of a sublime landscape Easterners could scarcely imagine; the unmanipulated prints - sometimes mammoth in scale - sometimes formatted to lifelike stereo - served as simple proof. By the 1900's when modernism hit its mark and photographers such as Paul Strand began propagandizing for photographic objectivity, straight photography came to signify an optical imperative, or "truth," that was a modernist truth of rational science, heroic industry, and social progress. Performing this new reality of twentieth-century modernism, American photographers embraced sharp focus and monumental form, conjuring symbols of potent self-assurance, which might strike us today as hopelessly, fabulously, macho, confident, optimistic, naive. 

Naturally, straight photography was never conceived in opposition to "gay photography" (IF E. Holland Day and Minor White had thoughts on this, they kept it to themselves). But today the dyad is obvious and easy game. Queer is a serviceable counter to monolithic, dominant histories of heroic modernism - Duchamp versus Picasso, Warhol versus Pollock. But if flamboyant color and a sense of tragedy seem to denote a "camp" sensibility, defined by Susan Sontag fifty years ago as a "love of artifice and exaggeration," history has now overwhelmed such quaint classifications. Rather than thinking of Sherry's Photographs as a queering or personalizing of a Western landscape tradition, with environmental overtones, it might be more insightful to point out that photography - straight or otherwise - always has made the world queer, abstracting and two-dimensionalizing everything it records. In that sense, Sherry's work does not queer American modernist photography so much as it brings to the surface what was already latent: a queer and common feeling of alienation from the "natural" as well as the modern world. Today, as so-called aberrant sexualities become more normative, and technologies elaborate denser skeins of mediation between humans and their natural environments, the outsider's perspective becomes the norm. 

- Kevin Moore writing on David Benjamin Sherry in Aperture 218: Queer, Spring 2015 (bolding mine)

"These feelings — anxiety, despair, hatred, greed — ... have elements of delusion, elements you'd be better off without. And if you think you would be better off, imagine how the whole world would be. After all, feelings like despair and hatred and greed can foster wars and atrocities. So if what I'm saying is true — if the basic sources of human suffering and human cruelty are indeed in large part the product of delusion — there is value in exposing this delusion to the light."

- Robert Wright in Why Buddhism is True

Goldfrapp, "Systemagic" 2017

"Among those who don’t write, it is perhaps difficult to fathom the important role that not-writing plays in writing. Gertrude Stein famously quipped that in order to be a writer, one must have lots of time at one’s disposal to do nothing. Given the dominant role that introspection plays in every creative process—especially one that is in many ways a direct transmission of mind—such activities as reading, traveling to foreign lands, taking long walks, and staring into space should be understood as playing an equal, if not more important, role as actually putting words down on paper. We might go so far as to say that with regard to writing, there is no such thing as procrastination; indeed, procrastination, not-writingis the very essence of writing. "
- Travis Jeppesen on artist Heman Chong in Art in America

Jean-Michel Basquiat To Repel Ghosts. 1986

Jean-Michel Basquiat To Repel Ghosts. 1986


9/19/17

9/19/17

Twin Peaks The Return, Part 8 - Dir. David Lynch, 2017
Music "Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima" by Krzysztof Penderecki, 1960

Lee Miller (1907-1977), Siwa Egypt, 1937 Gelatin silver print, 14 9/16 x 10 5/16"; Lee Miller Archive "Lee Miller (1907-1977) was an American surrealist photographer who started as a model, and was often photographed by Man Ray. She went on to become a noted photographer in her own right, and was possibly the only woman combat photographer during World War II. She photographed active combat throughout Europe, and was present with her camera when American GIs entered Dachau for the first time, giving the world its first look at the horror inside the concentration camps. She may be best known for the photos taken of her in Hitler’s bathtub while GIs occupied his house after the liberation of the camps. After the war, she suffered from what is today known as PTSD and the bulk of her photos were discovered by her family only after her death.  In between her discovery of surrealist art and becoming a war correspondent, Lee Miller moved to Egypt and took some of her most enduring photos there. Dr. Peter Schulman will talk about this visionary period in Lee Miller’s life, the images themselves, and Lee Miller’s contributions to surrealism." (via The Seligmann Center) 

Lee Miller (1907-1977), Siwa Egypt, 1937 Gelatin silver print, 14 9/16 x 10 5/16"; Lee Miller Archive

"Lee Miller (1907-1977) was an American surrealist photographer who started as a model, and was often photographed by Man Ray. She went on to become a noted photographer in her own right, and was possibly the only woman combat photographer during World War II. She photographed active combat throughout Europe, and was present with her camera when American GIs entered Dachau for the first time, giving the world its first look at the horror inside the concentration camps. She may be best known for the photos taken of her in Hitler’s bathtub while GIs occupied his house after the liberation of the camps. After the war, she suffered from what is today known as PTSD and the bulk of her photos were discovered by her family only after her death. 

In between her discovery of surrealist art and becoming a war correspondent, Lee Miller moved to Egypt and took some of her most enduring photos there. Dr. Peter Schulman will talk about this visionary period in Lee Miller’s life, the images themselves, and Lee Miller’s contributions to surrealism." (via The Seligmann Center

9/13/17
© 2006 WMG Don't Tell Me

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Light Spectrum Detail

"It’s too facile to say that the mysteries of Twin Peaks can be waved off as 'just a dream.' But from Eraserhead to Lost Highway to Mulholland Dr., Lynch has long shown a fascination with how fragile our reality can be, given that so much of our understanding of ourselves and our world is defined by what our brains have retained — often hazily. We tend to remember dreams as a series of connected events that seemed vivid and logical at the time, but that recede as we try to piece them back together. That’s not too far removed from how we sometimes recall our own pasts."

- Noel Murray writing about Twin Peaks season 3, episode 14 for The New York Times

Sunday July 9, 2017: Andy Lee's Infrared Landscapes. (2) // www.andylee.co

Sunday July 9, 2017: Andy Lee's Infrared Landscapes. (2) // www.andylee.co

Above: Chautauqua Summer Studio 2015 - Durational visual mapping of my time spent in one place < - > translation into work that can exist outside the studio. 


Summer, 2014 - I finally was able to finish the editions of prints that I started from my residency in Venice last summer. These are in process shots while printing at Rutgers. Many, many thanks is owed to Randy Hemminghaus for all his help - these editions wouldn't have happened without him.

Madonna - Nobody Knows Me - MDNA Tour - 2012

Madonna - Get Stupid - Sticky & Sweet Tour - 2008

Madonna - Sorry Remix - The Confessions Tour - 2006

Abstract cyanotypes from my printmaking residency in Venice.

In the physical studio. Photo by Vina Sananikone.

In the physical studio. Photo by Vina Sananikone.

All of my creation is an effort to weave a web of connection with the world; I am always weaving it because it was once broken.
Anais Nin, 1942