Hello. Welcome to Nerve Center. 
That which is currently swirling inside my mind. 

"Such a collection of ephemeral treasure is an example of how we find the things that tell us who we are, even if it gives instead the impression that a parallel universe of KM’s own work has found him - by carefully infiltrating the most ordinary places: the local newspaper, or the fold of a carton of milk, or the back of a parking ticket." (Elliman)

Jean-Michel Basquiat To Repel Ghosts. 1986

Jean-Michel Basquiat To Repel Ghosts. 1986


9/19/17

9/19/17

Twin Peaks The Return, Part 8 - Dir. David Lynch, 2017
Music "Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima" by Krzysztof Penderecki, 1960

Lee Miller (1907-1977), Siwa Egypt, 1937 Gelatin silver print, 14 9/16 x 10 5/16"; Lee Miller Archive "Lee Miller (1907-1977) was an American surrealist photographer who started as a model, and was often photographed by Man Ray. She went on to become a noted photographer in her own right, and was possibly the only woman combat photographer during World War II. She photographed active combat throughout Europe, and was present with her camera when American GIs entered Dachau for the first time, giving the world its first look at the horror inside the concentration camps. She may be best known for the photos taken of her in Hitler’s bathtub while GIs occupied his house after the liberation of the camps. After the war, she suffered from what is today known as PTSD and the bulk of her photos were discovered by her family only after her death.  In between her discovery of surrealist art and becoming a war correspondent, Lee Miller moved to Egypt and took some of her most enduring photos there. Dr. Peter Schulman will talk about this visionary period in Lee Miller’s life, the images themselves, and Lee Miller’s contributions to surrealism." (via The Seligmann Center) 

Lee Miller (1907-1977), Siwa Egypt, 1937 Gelatin silver print, 14 9/16 x 10 5/16"; Lee Miller Archive

"Lee Miller (1907-1977) was an American surrealist photographer who started as a model, and was often photographed by Man Ray. She went on to become a noted photographer in her own right, and was possibly the only woman combat photographer during World War II. She photographed active combat throughout Europe, and was present with her camera when American GIs entered Dachau for the first time, giving the world its first look at the horror inside the concentration camps. She may be best known for the photos taken of her in Hitler’s bathtub while GIs occupied his house after the liberation of the camps. After the war, she suffered from what is today known as PTSD and the bulk of her photos were discovered by her family only after her death. 

In between her discovery of surrealist art and becoming a war correspondent, Lee Miller moved to Egypt and took some of her most enduring photos there. Dr. Peter Schulman will talk about this visionary period in Lee Miller’s life, the images themselves, and Lee Miller’s contributions to surrealism." (via The Seligmann Center

9/13/17
© 2006 WMG Don't Tell Me

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Light Spectrum Detail

"It’s too facile to say that the mysteries of Twin Peaks can be waved off as 'just a dream.' But from Eraserhead to Lost Highway to Mulholland Dr., Lynch has long shown a fascination with how fragile our reality can be, given that so much of our understanding of ourselves and our world is defined by what our brains have retained — often hazily. We tend to remember dreams as a series of connected events that seemed vivid and logical at the time, but that recede as we try to piece them back together. That’s not too far removed from how we sometimes recall our own pasts."

- Noel Murray writing about Twin Peaks season 3, episode 14 for The New York Times

Sunday July 9, 2017: Andy Lee's Infrared Landscapes. (2) // www.andylee.co

Sunday July 9, 2017: Andy Lee's Infrared Landscapes. (2) // www.andylee.co

Above: Chautauqua Summer Studio 2015 - Durational visual mapping of my time spent in one place < - > translation into work that can exist outside the studio. 


Summer, 2014 - I finally was able to finish the editions of prints that I started from my residency in Venice last summer. These are in process shots while printing at Rutgers. Many, many thanks is owed to Randy Hemminghaus for all his help - these editions wouldn't have happened without him.

Abstract cyanotypes from my printmaking residency in Venice.

In the physical studio. Photo by Vina Sananikone.

In the physical studio. Photo by Vina Sananikone.

All of my creation is an effort to weave a web of connection with the world; I am always weaving it because it was once broken.
Anais Nin, 1942