Who Owns Space and Time?

(Bolding for emphasis.)

“To explore the artistic, philosophical, and political questions raised by [Tomas] Saraceno’s work, it might be useful to turn to another locus classicus—not the sphere versus network debate, but the debate over who owns the space in which we live collectively. There is no better way to frame this question than the bungled dialog (well, not really a “dialogue,” but that’s the point) between Henri Bergson and Albert Einstein in Paris in 1922. Bergson had carefully studied Einstein’s theory of relativity and wrote a thick book about it, but Einstein had only a few dismissive comments about Bergson’s argument. After Bergson spoke for thirty minutes, Einstein made a terse two-minute remark, ending with this damning sentence: ‘Hence there is no philosopher’s time; there is only a psychological time different from the time of the physicist.’ While Bergson had argued that his notion of space and time had a cosmological import that was to be carefully meshed within Einstein’s remarkable discoveries, Einstein argued that there was only one time and space—that of physics—and that what Bergson was after was nothing more than subjective time—that of psychology. We recognize here the classical way for scientists to deal with philosophy, politics, and art: ‘What you say might be nice and interesting but it has no cosmological relevance because it only deals with the subjective elements, the lived world, not the real world.’ The funny thing is that everyone—including, in a way, Bergson—was convinced that he had lost, and that indeed the whole question was another episode in the gigantomachy of objective reality versus subjective illusion. To the scientists, the cosmos, and to the rest of us, the phenomenology of human intentionality. So the answer to the question “Which space do we live in?” is clearly: we live in a subjective world with no reality for physics. Einstein: winner. But this was the beginning of the twentieth century.

Can we do better at the beginning of the twenty-first century? In other words, is it possible to give Bergson another chance to make his case that, no, he is not talking about subjective time and space, but is rather proposing an alternative to Einstein’s cosmology? To explore such a possibility, I decided to rely on the fascinating genre of the reenactment. As many artists have shown, especially Rod Dickinson in the amazing staging of Milgram’s experiment, reenactment is not a mere facsimile of the original but a second version, or a second print of the first instance, allowing for the exploration of its originality. This is why, in a series of lectures at the Pompidou Center in June 2010, I invited, among many others, the artist Olafur Eliasson and two scholars, a historian of science, Jimena Canales, and a philosopher, Elie During, to reenact the famous debate by allowing the conclusion to shift somewhat, thus reopening a possibility that had been closed in the twentieth century.

Who owns the concepts of space and time? Artists? Philosophers? Scientists? Do we live in the space-time of Einstein without realizing it, or, as Bergson vainly argued, does Einstein, the physicist, live in the time of what Bergson called duration? Those questions, it seemed to me, were just as important for physicists, historians, and philosophers as they are for an artist like Eliasson, who has populated museums and cities around the world by publicly demonstrating, through many artful connections between science, technology, and ecology, that there are many alternatives to the visual experience of common sense. The art form—or forum—that I chose consisted of asking the three of them to conjoin their forces in presenting films and photographs to set the stage for this famous debate, with Eliasson “refereeing” the debate through his own work.

It may seem silly to ask an artist to adjudicate a debate between a philosopher and a physicist—especially a debate whose pecking order had been historically settled once and for all: the physicist speaks of the real world, and the philosopher ‘does not understand physics’; the artist is irrelevant here. But that was precisely the point, a point shared by Saraceno’s heterarchy: that it is now possible to complicate the hierarchy of voices and make the conversation between disciplines move ahead in a way that is more representative of the twenty-first century than of the twentieth. No discipline is the final arbiter of any other.

That is exactly what Elie During did in a brilliant piece of philosophical fiction in which he entirely rewrote the 1922 dialogue as if Einstein had actually paid attention to what Bergson had told him. In the end, Zweistein—that is, the Einstein of 2010—was not, of course, convinced (that would have been a falsification, and no longer a fiction), but he had to admit that there might be more philosophy in his physics than he had claimed in 1922. Where Einstein had won, Zweistein had to settle for a draw. So now we have a more balanced situation: the space and time in which we live—experientially, phenomenologically—might not be a mere mistake of our subjective self, but might have some relevance for what the world is really like. Instead of accepting the divide between physics and philosophy, this reenactment was a means of answering Alfred North Whitehead’s famous question: ‘When red is found in nature, what else is found there also?’ Likewise, is it possible to imagine a world where scientific knowledge is able to add to the world instead of dismissing the experience of being in the world?”

- Bruno Latour, Some Experiments in Art and Politics via e-flux.

JRR Up+Coming, Fall 2015

This latter half of 2015 has been super busy, of which I am grateful for. From late June to mid-August, I spent 7 weeks at a residency at The Chautauqua Institution in upstate New York - the longest period of uninterrupted time I've had to spend on my work, ever. It was transformational. Coming back with a new body of work and into the fall, there are a couple exciting things to mention right now:

For one, if you happen to find yourselves in New York on October 17th and 18th, I encourage  all to stop by the ICPNY Printfest - of which I will I have some work included with several other current Rutgers peeps + alums. I am aiming to get there myself on Saturday from DC, so I will look forward to seeing you if you stop on by. 

(With many thanks to Maximiliano Ferro, Barb Madsen and Randy Hemminghaus for organizing this for Rutgers!)

Similarly, I have another large show coming up in coordination with the post-MFA residency I completed at the Torpedo Factory Art Center earlier this year. This year's residents - Stephanie BoothSteve SkowronJenny Wu and myself - will be showcasing the work we did while there in an exhibition starting October 24th and running through November 29th. 

An opening reception for this show will be Thursday, November 12th from 6-8pm at the Torpedo Factory's Target Gallery. 

For those outside of the DC area, if you happen to find yourselves in the DMV, I'd love for you to stop on by during the run of the show (and please let me know, I'd also love to walk you through it!). And for those of us around the beltway, I sincerely hope to see you all on November 12th!

A Week on the Internet, January 5th through 11th, 2015

Firstly, I spent the latter part of this past week in New Orleans with my very good friend Vina - with it being the first time I had been to the moody, sultry city. In true fashion to my continued habit of late blooming, the best day I had walking those moist streets was the last day I was there. Perhaps it was because it was the lord's day and it put a vice on some sins, but the city was quieter and calmer, except for the wonderful waves of jazz that hung in the humid, winter air. And I mean this quite literally, as the street performers were out in full force - and that's fine by me, as they quickly became one of my favorite things about the city.

With my own home, being from New York is a double-edged sword; on one hand, you grow up with all that the (arguably) most famous city in the world has to offer. But on the other, you're doomed to spend the rest of your life comparing every other city to it; once you have New York as your standard, it's hard to raise the bar.

Yet, I couldn't help but think of the street performers of New Orleans in relation to the many, many artists that inhabit New York. I left thinking that all of us New York artists should only be so grateful if we inhabit a just small portion of the unrecognized talent and passion that the musicians in New Orleans possess.


An Artist Residency Aboard a Cargo Ship (via Hyperallergic; For more information or to apply, go here)

“The port scenery at night was striking and almost surreal,” she remembered, “massive stacks of containers, heavy machinery, bells ringing, workers shouting, commotion that felt somewhat archaic.” They set sail toward New Jersey on a three-week trip with stops in Greece, Italy, and Spain. “Crossing the Atlantic took exactly one week — so every night you get an extra hour of sleep, which was delightful.”

The journey was a boon to Strauss’s artistic practice. She used the opportunity to take photographs that became Freight, a series of lush, moody photographs that capture life on the vessel. The experience also widened her perspective on so many things: the hugeness of the earth, the vastness of the ocean, the structure of contemporary cities, the importance of unplugging from the world every once in a while. And of course, the maritime shipping industry.

Luise Rainer, First Star to Win Consecutive Acting Oscars, Dead at 104 - via The Huffington Post. (First of all, this woman lived to be 104, god bless'er. Second of all, I always love reading about semi-forgotten Hollywood stars from the golden yesteryear. A, it gives me hope that the Kardashians will be forgotten some day soon, and B, there's a bit of a "circle of life" to it - a cyclical pattern of memory. It's a bittersweetness I always seem to long for.)

What it Really Takes to be an Artist: MacArthur Genius Teresita Fernández's Magngicent Commencement Address - via Brain Pickings

You are about to enter the much more difficult phase of unlearning everything you have learned in college, of questioning it, redefining it, challenging it, and reinventing it to call it your own. More than in any other vocation, being an artist means always starting from nothing. Our work as artists is courageous and scary. There is no brief that comes along with it, no problem solving that’s given as a task… An artist’s work is almost entirely inquiry based and self-regulated. It is a fragile process of teaching oneself to work alone, and focusing on how to hone your quirky creative obsessions so that they eventually become so oddly specific that they can only be your own . . .

. . . Being an artist is not just about what happens when you are in the studio. The way you live, the people you choose to love and the way you love them, the way you vote, the words that come out of your mouth, the size of the world you make for yourselves, your ability to influence the things you believe in, your obsessions, your failures — all of these components will also become the raw material for the art you make.

Mysterious Legendary Metal (from the lost city of Atlantis) Found in Ancient Shipwreck - via IFLScience

Mars Curiosity Photos Suggest Life May Have Existed on Red Planet - via NBC News

 

Ongoing List of Unexplained Events

January 12, 2015 2:59am - "Blackburn 'Ghost' Caught on Video as Angry Apparition Chases Car." (via The Huffington Post)

May 23, 2014 12:34pm - "Catching Your Past Life Murderer." (via Popular Science)

May 22, 2014 4:04am - "Aliens Are Almost Definitely Out There, SETI Astronomers Tell Congress." (via The Huffington Post)

April 23, 2014 2:54pm - "Footage Shows Ghostly Figure Sweep Across Soccer Stadium." (link)

April 21, 2014 12:48pm - "'Loch Ness Monster' Spotted on Apple Maps." (link)

April 14, 2014 8:38pm - "Weird Black Ring Appeared in the Sky in England and then Disappeared." (link)

April 9, 2014 5:32pm - "Caught in the Headlights? Experts Explain Deer-Cam UFO." (link)

April 7, 2014 4:06pm - "Rossendale Fairies: Skeptics Swarm Over Alleged 'Fairy' Photos." (link)

February 14, 2012 - "Enormous slow-moving UFO spotted in sky above Toronto." (link)

 

My week on the Internet, December 29, 2014 - January 4, 2015

Happy New Year!

The Cheap Airfare Loophole United Doesn't Want You to Know About - via Gothamist (This article is pretty much inconsequential - other than the fact that it's about, you know, huge, smarmy mega-conglomerates that want to rob consumers blind - Beyond that though, Gothomist has some really great writers working for them. Consider the following gem from that article: "The painted smiles and winking offers of an extra bag of pretzels are a sham: Airlines are not your friends. Recall that airline companies last year raked in nearly $32 billion in ancillary revenue by instating bullshit fees for stuff like checked bags, priority boarding and legroom that doesn't violate the Geneva Convention. This is a 1200 percent increase since 2007. With $32 billion in Popcorners you could build yourself an edible flotation device the size of Sri Lanka and drift anywhere you damn well please." Bravo, Lauren Evans. Bravo.

Susan Sontag on Aphorims and the Commodification of Wisdom - via Brain Pickings (Full disclosure, I absolutely love Susan Sontag. Despite that I may not always be 100% on board with what she says, more often than not, I do find myself searching for a ticket to her voyage of thought. In these small tidbits, assembled by Maria Popova, I found myself fully in support of a notion that I had been feeling bubbling upside me for a long while, but unable to articulate it as eloquently as Sontag. Part of this on my end may be that I'm still recovering from and still trying to purge a bad bout of academic bile. Many times in arts academia, both as an instructor and as a (perpetual) student, there is a feeling that much time is spent sparring with overly combative half-thoughts from peers in which judgement is then placed on the recipient if they failed to decipher accurately these half-assed notions of highly opinionated and self-referential aesthetic blah blah. My problem with that, I've realized, is very similar to what Sontag begins to lay out here - in that this kind of thinking, under the guise of knowledge, actually does not produce free-thinking or understanding - something that seems counter intuitive to an academic setting. Instead it produces group-think and narrowmindedness, a cycle that gets exemplified among a group of people who have no intention of believing anything other than their own opinions. Or as Sontag puts so well, "a wisdom of pessimism." A phrase that so accurately captures so much of what making art today can mean. Though "pessimism" may and can be so often interchangeable with "apathy." "Aphoristic thinking is impatient thinking: by its very brevity or concentratedness, it presupposes a superior standard . . . " Indeed. )

The Art World Circa 2015, As Explained By the Glory of Instagram - via New York Observer (Oh, snarky art world banter, how I love thee [as long as it's not referencing me, of course]. Nate Freeman wittingly and wittily comments on various NYC art world photos. A sample of my favorites below.)

So what's happening in the actual world, where people don't speak in inflated aphorisms about their own work? Oh, that's right, art is selling for a shitload of money. In February, Sotheby's gavelmeister Oliver Barker is pictured here as he gets ready to hammer this Richter for $17.4 million. What goes through your head when you successfully sell some swirly colors on a canvas for more money that your entire family has ever possessed?

Christie's had a hit with "If I Live I'll See You Tuesday," a special auction put together by Loic Gouzer that had the audacity to spotlight young painters like members of The Still House Collective. Some gasped, some yawned, and you couldn't really tell the difference because it's just mouths opening and closing.

It's not cold in New York in May, but there is some Frieze for a few days.

...it's Koons time. We're finally back from Basel, land of the $80 cocktail, to explore the permutations of modesty at "Jeff Koons: A Retrospective."

Abortion Politics: Baby Talk - via The Economist (Another wonderfully written article)

A NORTH CAROLINA law enacted in 2011 requires every woman seeking an abortion to submit, between four and 72 hours before the procedure, to an ultrasound of her developing foetus. The Woman’s Right to Know Act (which, in less Orwellian terms, might be called the North Carolina Right to Harangue Act) . . .

Nearly two dozen states have some form of ultrasound law, but North Carolina is one of only three requiring doctors to continue speaking even as women are plugging their ears or averting their gaze from the monitor. The scene would be comical if it weren’t nightmarish.

Scientists discover that trees yelp when they're running out of water - via Inhabitat (Because that's not horrifying.)

Over this past weekend, I also finally got a chance to see The Theory of Everything, which I thoroughly enjoyed even if I did feel it was more of a romance story than I had anticipated. Eddie Redmayne as Stephen Hawking is astonishingly all engrossing with Felicity Jones seemingly that much more elegant in her performance, contrasted as possessing a quiet and unshakable strength with an unfailing faith both in her husband and in her own ability to be the muscle of the family that Stephen so tragically lacks.

This was also serendipitous as I saw the above animation this past week as well, though it came out originally in 2013. In it, the theory of black holes is discussed, along with the presumption that it was the singularity of a black hole - the unfathomably dense center of a black hole collapsed in upon itself - that gave way to the big bang, the obvious creation of our own universe. I had heard this theory floating around before, though this was the first time I had heard of it being spoken of as a factual event. And that's not to say that I'm discounting it - for one, I'm obviously not a physicist and for two, I've always been atrociously abysmal at mathematics, finding the untamed philosophy behind its implications much more fascinating than actually having to prove anything with facts or data.  Yet, for this specific instance, if the singularity/big-bang theory is correct, I find it enthralling for the implications of how the universe (and beyond) work/s. If each black hole collapses into a singularity, resulting in a big-bang of sorts, the existence of a multiverse is implied as a highly logical possibility. I find that extremely exciting.

I often think about how if this information was more in the public discourse, how it might influence opinion and policy. In that light, I find the ensuing religious wars surrounding our faith-based government ludicrous, and not in the realm of trying to disprove that a "God" of sorts exists - but in the fact that most people believe in a very small and puny god if they think that all of what science discovers is outside a godly possibility from an infinitely wise consciousness as interpreted by the finite human mind.

A Week on the Internet, December 22 - December 28, 2014

FDA Decides You Shouldn't Be Banned From Blood Donations For A Limetime. Just A Year - via Queerty (As per my personal Facebook page, I wrote the following rant: What a half-assed attempt at passive-aggressive heteronormative tolerance. I'm often on the fence as to if gay sex is still revolutionary in an age of post-Will & Grace, but apparently it might just be if the FDA is still scared of and willing to still discriminate against it - even if only for a year.)

2 Futures Can Explain Time's Mysterious Past - via Scientific American (Or, here's the tagline if you really want your head to hurt: "New theories suggest the big bang was not the beginning, and that we may live in the past of a parallel universe." Insert confused Britney Spears side-eye gif here.)

Do Aliens Know It's Christmas? - via The New York Times (or, "How Possibilities of Life Elsewhere Might Alter Held Notions of Faith.)

Photographer Shares How He Spent Two Years Living on Photos Instead of Money - via Petapixel (Aka my new hero.)

The Messy Minds of Creative People - via Scientific American

"The Messy Minds of Creative People" comes with this wonderful graph that I sincerely cannot at all relate to whatsoever on my professional site where I always put my best self forward and reveal no flaws at all in order to show how organized and professional I am in all situations.

"The Messy Minds of Creative People" comes with this wonderful graph that I sincerely cannot at all relate to whatsoever on my professional site where I always put my best self forward and reveal no flaws at all in order to show how organized and professional I am in all situations.

Wolves Introduced To Park To Revitalize Ecosystem - via The San Francisco Globe (This is a really great, short video about how one simple act can send ripples of change through an environment. A wonderful lesson.)

Navajo version of Finding Nemo released to help keep the language alive - via Hulu #amazing

Linky Link Links, or "My Week on the Internet" - December 14 - 21, 2014

New UFO Hotspot: Medellin, Columbia (Video) - via Huffington Post
(colleagues of mine, the Floating Lab Collective, coincidentally traveled to Medellin within the past few years to do work there. Now, all makes sense.)

An Open Letter to Oprah, Whose 'Life You Want Tour' Asked Me to Work for Free - via Digital Music News

America's Police on Trial: The United States Needs to Overhaul its Law-Enforcement System - via The Economist

How one white mother talked to her two black children about racism in America - via The Washington Post

Q-Tip Schools Iggy Azalea on Hip Hop History And We're All Better For It - via Jezebel

Of course it's frustrating that one of the greatest lyricists has to take the time to teach a rapper about the genre of music she and some producers decided fit her best (like a piece of clothing she can take off), that this conversation had to happen in the first place.

What Happened When Marissa Mayer Tried to be Steve Jobs - via The New York Times
(There was an article I also read - which I now cannot remember where and when - that argued perhaps it's not entirely fair to push Mayer off a supposed "glass cliff" when she fails to clean up a mess that men had made and that subsequent men can't clean up any better. It was an position stated much more elegantly and eloquently than how I just attempted, if I can recollect the piece, I'll link to it.)

The Unidentified Queen of Torture - via The New Yorker

A former intelligence officer who worked directly with her is quoted by NBC, on background, as saying that she bears so much responsibility for so many intelligence failures that “she should be put on trial and put in jail for what she has done.”

Instead, however, she has been promoted to the rank of a general in the military, most recently working as the head of the C.I.A.’s global-jihad unit. In that perch, she oversees the targeting of terror suspects around the world. (She was also, in part, the model for the lead character in “Zero Dark Thirty.”)

U.S. Not Fully Prepared for Nuclear Terrorist Attack or Large Scale Natural Disaster, GAO says - via The Huffington Post

Dystopian Fiction's Popularity is a Warning Sign for the Future - via Wired (in full dialog with Naomi Klein and her latest book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs The Climate)

“I think what these films tell us is that we’re taking a future of environmental catastrophe for granted . . . and that’s the hardest part of my work, actually convincing people that we’re capable of something other than this brutal response to disaster."
Keep on fighting the good fight, Ms. Klein.

Court Rules Orangutan Held In Argentina Zoo Is 'Non-Human Person' And Can Be Freed - via The Huffington Post/Reuters

Orangutan is a word from the Malay and Indonesian languages that means "forest man."

Defense Bill Passes, Giving Sacred Native American Site to Mining Company - via The Huffington Post
(In coordination with the Naomi Klein piece I referenced above, I would like to say - HELLO HAVE YOU PEOPLE NOT SEEN POLTERGEIST?!)

Santa's real workshop: the town in China that makes the world's Christmas decorations - via The Guardian
#youreameanonemrgrinch

U.S. Weighs Response to Sony Cyberattack, with North Korea Confrontation Possible - via The New York Times

You don't protect my freedom: Our childish insistence on calling soldiers heros deadens real democracy - and the subsequent - My week in the right wing lie machine; When Fox News, Twitchy and Montel Williams declared war on me - both via Salon.com

The overwhelming majority of readers who reacted with rage to my article showed no evidence of actually reading it.

Best Physics Videos of 2014 - via Scientific American

A Lost Purple Pigment, Where Quantum Physics and the Terracotta Warriors Collide - via Hyperallergic

Art of Darkness

I was really fortunate to be a part of a show back in mid-September at the Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts out in Fridley, Minnesota, headed by the really wonderful Bethany Whitehead. I'm still working on putting together the documentation, but below was a call put out for people who had paranormal experiences within the gallery space. It was a really interesting show to be a part of. I also must thank Cory Miller and Twin Cities Paranormal Research and Investigation for allowing me to tag along and record much of their group investigation of the Banfill-Locke site. If you're in the Twin Cities area and need some paranormal advice, be sure to check them out! 

True Colors 2nd Annual Exhibition, Press Street Gallery, New Orleans

I am super excited to be included in the 2nd Annual True Colors Exhibition, which focuses on both emerging and established LGBTQ artists. The show runs from August 9th to 29th in New Orleans, with an opening and closing reception on those dates, respectively. If anyone is in the area, I highly encourage you to go check it out (partially so I can live vicariously through you)! I'm sorry I won't be able to make it down there myself.

There's more information here.

 
(I couldn't find a good True Colors gif, so this will have to do.)

(I couldn't find a good True Colors gif, so this will have to do.)


This trailer

deserves an award. It's easily the best trailer for a movie that I've ever seen - even more so because the actual trailer is so much better than the movie itself. The derelict alarm that is from the original Alien still gives me goosebumps and freaks me every time I watch it. 

On realness.

In other words, even though the lip sync is a form of pure artifice, there is an essential truth about the self to be conveyed through it — that by mouthing someone else’s words, you can give voice to your own. This, honey, is what we call realness.

Lip syncing as Baudrillardian simulacra.

From "The 10 Best Lip-Sync Battles From RuPaul's Drag Race," by E. Alex Jung for vulture.com.

2014 CAA Fellowships

I happened to come across the list of emerging artists who were awarded or received honorable mention for CAA fellowships for 2014, and there's a lot of great work amongst them. Here are a few who I personally responded to: 

Ann Bartges - http://annbartges.com
Liss LaFleur - http://www.lisslafleur.com
Jaime C. Knight - http://www.jaimecknight.com
Patrick Segura - http://patricksegura.com
Valentina Vella - http://valentinavella.net/main

A CAA Fellowship was something that I should have applied for in grad school, but never could get my shit together in order to do so, something I now regret. I highly encourage all graduate students to apply - it's essentially a big help towards your work and academic expenses. You can find out more information here

Liz.

"Somebody once asked me once what quality it was in me that made me a survivor. I think it's my passion - for life, for people, for everything. I've always been very aware of the inner me, that has nothing to do with the physical me. It has to do with a connection with nature, God, your inner being - whatever you want to call it. It's about being in contact with yourself and allowing God to mold you.

Because I'm not afraid. Life is just an adventure to me."

 

Elizabeth Taylor, who would have been 82 today. 

From a RollingStone article by Jonathan Cott.

(And here's Peter Travers recommending her best films for a freebee.) 

Links for taking the red pill. (Sunday, February 23, 2014)

SGCI!

With many thanks to Kelli Sincock and the Northern Virginia Printmaker's Guild, I have a print that is in a portfolio going to Southern Graphics this year. Super excited. It'll be my first time attending the conference, which is in San Francisco for 2014. Work hard, then play hard - and there's hardly a better place to do so than the city by the bay. 

Causeways, Pathways & Interfaces: Bridging The Unseen

Location: Academy of Art University,Print Studios at 60 Federal Street (3rdFloor)
Date: Saturday, March 29th
Organizer: Kelli Sincock
Participants: Meaghan Busch, Catherine Cole, Fleming Jeffries, Minji Myongsook Kim, Nahid Navab, Rae Ouellette, Norma E. Pfaff, Jorge Luis Porrata, Alice Quatrochi, Justin Raphael Roykovich, Kelli Sincock, Steven Skowron, Elizabeth Janis Sweeney

This portfolio is an exploration of the metaphorical and literal structure that facilitates or creates a causeway, pathway or interface between one physical form and another thus formulating a “bridge” between disparate systems. This bridge acts as a means of transferring information, thought, feeling, sound, and light – without it the sustainability of the “system” either fails or becomes vulnerable to external influences. This portfolio’s aim is to explore a variety of “bridging systems”, both seen and unseen, that form and inform the functioning of our daily lives.

Kelli Sincock is the founder and organizer of the NOVA Printmaker’s Guild which represents Printmakers, Book Artists and Paper Artists in the VA/MD/DC Metro area. Kelli is currently a Printmaking major at George Mason University, in Fairfax, Virginia and she holds a Bachelors Degree in Interdisciplinary Art with an emphasis in Metalsmithing from the University of Washington, Seattle. Kelli’s artwork represents a blending of her interests in both 2D and 3D. Her art is heavily influenced by her interest in nature, physics, spirituality, literature and the human condition.

http://sgcisanfrancisco.org/causeways-pathways-interfaces-bridging-the-unseen/

In preparation for thesis . . .

For my upcoming MFA thesis, I worked with the wonderful Bearfort Paranormal to do an investigation of my childhood home in northern New Jersey. Below are a few outtakes from photos they took during the time we spent conducting the investigation.

Setting up equipment outside.

An orb in the attic?

Faces in the bushes? 

Not a ghost, but we apparently disturbed a poor owl just trying to live his life. He's in the middle left side, looking up, wondering what's going on.

Thesis countdown: 2 weeks to go!